Flex+Max™ Optimized Pellet by Absorbine®

  • Best Trait = pelleted for ease of feeding
  • Worst Trait = poor company communication

Consider this product if…

  1. You can not provide a liquid or powder form of a joint supplement.
  2. You want the cheapest cost per 1,000 mg of glucosamine.
  3. You appreciate its availability online.

Why Review this Product?

Joint supplements are the most ubiquitous horse supplements available on the market today. According to survey results published in 2017, over one third of all equine supplement sales are for joint protective products (Swirsley et al., 2017). Sifting through the plethora of products available is worse than finding a needle in a haystack, and that doesn’t even start to consider the confounding research findings! The list of ingredients and combinations of ingredients is endless, so for this review, I’m going to narrow my search down to joint supplements that meet the following criteria…

  1. Ingredients have been researched in horses and show positive results.
  2. It’s a company that I’ve heard of and has been around for a while.
  3. Contains at least 5,000 mg of glucosamine (any form)
  4. Contains chondroitin sulfate
  5. Contains methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM)

The American Association of Equine Practitioners has a WONDERFUl website that I’d like to LINK HERE titled “Joint Health Supplements: Information and How to Read a Product Label“. The AAEP suggests a very similar methodology to Rate My Horse Supplement when reviewing joint supplements, so I will refrain from duplicating that information here.

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Absorbine failed to respond to my email questions within 7 days. I have yet to hear back details about their safety and quality standards, credentials of the creator, or peer- reviewed evidence to support their claims. However, I did appreciate how easy it was to find information on their website. I can not give them higher than 2 stars until I hear back.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 2 out of 5.

“Administer 75g once daily” for horses states the Directions for Use on the Flex+Max label. I don’t know about you, but that makes me cringe deeply! Why would I feed the same scoop to a 600 lb senior pony on maintenance, the same dosage as a 1,200 lb elite athlete?

On Course Equine Nutrition’s FeedFLIP rating system was named to describe my technique of reading feed labels- I start at the bottom. The bottom of most feed and supplement labels describes the company and any caution statements. Then, you move up to the feeding directions. I believe strongly that the most valuable part of any feed or supplement is the feeding directions. Not only can you ascertain the true purpose of the product, but you can also tell how well the ingredients are understood depending on the level of detail. You can assume how best to see the results that you want. You can calculate daily cost. The feeding directions must be determined before a nutritionist can formulate the product, so like the nutritionist, start there.

Ingredients List

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The active ingredients in Absorbine’s Flex+Max include flaxseed, rice bran, glucosamine HCl, MSM, low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and Boswellia serrata. Less than 75 grams (2.6 ounces) of flax and rice bran to any size horse is insignificant, so I’m not sure why they put them in the “active” ingredient list, but they do make the product sound fancy, don’t they!? The important joint ingredients, however, are great!

Absorbine is using the flax, rice bran and alfalfa meal as carriers, the calcium propionate as a preservative, and fenugreek as the flavoring all of which are satisfactory. When powders and liquids are not feasible due to feed room limitations, this could be a good pelleted product to keep buckets clean and improve palatability.

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 4 out of 5.

One scoop serving of this product will give your horse 10,000 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 5,000 mg of MSM, and 1,200 mg of chondroitin sulfate. Compared to other similar joint supplements, these guarantees are good and higher than average.

Cost

Rating: 4 out of 5.

A ten pound bucket of Flex+Max Optimized Pellets will set you back $89.95 on most websites with free shipping. This is about 60 days worth according to the feeding directions, so it will cost you $1.50 per day or about 15 cents per 1,000 mg of glucosamine. If we only look at the cost per day, then it may seem average, but the cost per 1,000 mg of glucosamine is lower than average.

Summary

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I am cautiously optimistic about this joint supplement- cautious because the company has failed to address my concerns about product safety and quality control, but optimistic about the value. I am also suspicious of pelleted forms of joint supplementation due to potential stability issues of the ingredients under high heat and pressure. If I find the right peer-reviewed evidence to support or refute this concern, I will update this review.

Next Level® Joint Liquid and Pellets by Farnam®

  • Best Trait = Relatively low cost when purchased by the gallon
  • Worst Trait = Guarantee levels for chondroitin and MSM

Consider this product if…

  1. Supplementing glucosamine for joint care is important to you but not so much chondroitin or MSM
  2. You want to provide a low cost joint supplement this is readily available at your local feed store
  3. You want to provide joint supplementation in a pellet form (not recommended)

Why Review this Product?

Joint supplements are the most ubiquitous horse supplements available on the market today. According to survey results published in 2017, over one third of all equine supplement sales are for joint protective products (Swirsley et al., 2017). Sifting through the plethora of products available is worse than finding a needle in a haystack, and that doesn’t even start to consider the confounding research findings! The list of ingredients and combinations of ingredients is endless, so for this review, I’m going to narrow my search down to joint supplements that meet the following criteria…

  1. Ingredients have been researched in horses and show positive results.
  2. It’s a company that I’ve heard of and has been around for a while.
  3. Contains at least 5,000 mg of glucosamine (any form)
  4. Contains chondroitin sulfate
  5. Contains methyl sulfonyl methane (MSM)

The American Association of Equine Practitioners has a WONDERFUl website that I’d like to LINK HERE titled “Joint Health Supplements: Information and How to Read a Product Label“. The AAEP suggests a very similar methodology to Rate My Horse Supplement when reviewing joint supplements, so I will refrain from duplicating that information here.

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 3 out of 5.

My impression from Farnam’s response to my standard list of questions is that Next Level Joint supplement is one in hundreds of products that they manufacture and distribute, so the representative did not want to spend much time addressing my questions. The answers were dismissive and nondescript. For example, when asked about advantages or disadvantages of pellet versus liquid, I was told that it was preference only. I was not offered peer reviewed evidence to support the product’s ingredients or guaranteed analysis. Nor could they bother to suggest feeding rates other than what was on the label (which is very little).

The company states that all Farnam supplements are manufactured at locations that follow AAFCO and National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) guidelines. Though not impressive, that is the standard.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Regardless of size, activity level, or life stage, the product label for Next Level joint is recommending 1 ounce as a maintenance scoop (2 per day for loading). That’s it…that’s the Feeding Directions for “Horses”….[sigh].

On Course Equine Nutrition’s FeedFLIP rating system was named to describe my technique of reading feed labels- I start at the bottom. The bottom of most feed and supplement labels describes the company and any caution statements. Then, you move up to the feeding directions. I believe strongly that the most valuable part of any feed or supplement is the feeding directions. Not only can you ascertain the true purpose of the product, but you can also tell how well the ingredients are understood. You can assume how best to see the results that you want. You can calculate daily cost. This is why the feeding directions rating is very important.

Ingredients List

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The active ingredients in the product include glucosamine sulfate (shellfish), methylsufonylmethane, ascorbic acid, chondroitin sulfate (poultry) and perna mussle. Glucosamine sulfate may have slightly lower bioavailability compared to glucosamine hydrochloride, but I wouldn’t stress about that too much. The inactive ingredients list is longer than the active ingredients list and includes flavoring, coloring, and preservatives.

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 2 out of 5.

The daily dose of glucosamine supplied by Next Level is 5,000 mg per day which is my minimum daily recommendation for joint supplementation. However, the chondroitin and MSM guarantees are much, much lower compared to other joint supplement that I have recently reviewed. Next Level by Farnam guarantees 14.5 mg per serving of chondroitin and 1,750 mg of MSM while all the others were over 1,000 mg per serving of chondroitin and 5,000 mg of MSM.

Cost

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I shopped around trying to find the best deal to purchase Next Level and found a gallon jug would cost me about $146-$149 with shipping to Montana. With 128 servings in a gallon, that brings the daily serving cost to $1.14. This is definitely the way to go as the 32 ounce jug would cost you $1.50 per serving. At $1.14 per ounce, you’ll spend $0.23 per 1,000 mg of glucosamine. Compared to Cosequin® Optimized with MSM (4 star rating), you will spend more per 1,000 mg of glucosamine for Next Level Joint.

Summary

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

Sadly, after taking a deeper look at Farnam’s Next Level joint product, I’m not likely to recommend this product in the future. The inclusion rates for glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM do not compare well to other similar supplements on the market for similar cost. I was also not impressed with the response from Farnam’s representative which lowers my confidence in the product.

Cosequin® Optimized with MSM by Nutramax Laboratories Veterinary Sciences, Inc.

  • Best Trait = product quality standards
  • Worst Trait = vague feeding directions

Consider this product if…

  1. You are looking for a safe, high quality, joint supplement for your active horse.
  2. Your horse has a condition that requires minimizing damage caused by joint inflammation.
  3. Company integrity, transparency, and product quality control are important to you.

Why Review this Product?

Joint supplements are the most ubiquitous horse supplements available on the market today. According to survey results published in 2017, over one third of all equine supplement sales are for joint protective products (Swirsley et al., 2017). Sifting through the plethora of products available is worse than finding a needle in a haystack, and that doesn’t even start to consider the confounding research findings! The list of ingredients and combinations of ingredients is endless, so for this review, I’m going to narrow my search down to joint supplements that meet the following criteria…

  1. Ingredients have been researched in horses and show positive results.
  2. It’s a company that I’ve heard of and has been around for a while.
  3. Contains at least 5,000 mg of glucosamine (any form)
  4. Contains chondroitin sulfate
  5. Contains methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)

The American Association of Equine Practitioners has a WONDERFUl website that I’d like to LINK HERE titled “Joint Health Supplements: Information and How to Read a Product Label“. The AAEP suggests a very similar methodology to Rate My Horse Supplement when reviewing joint supplements, so I will refrain from duplicating that information here.

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Nutramax Laboratories Veterinary Sciences, Inc. has developed and maintained a high quality reputation in the joint supplement arena for three decades. Since my first joint supplement search nearly 20 years ago, the Cosequin products seemed to filter out from the rest for all the reasons that OCEN gives companies high ratings; company integrity, quality control, communication, and above bar standards.

I sent several tough questions to Nutramax Labs and received a thoughtful reply within 24 hours from their Senior Veterinary Product Technical Specialist. It brightens my day to hear from companies that are really proud of their product quality control and that really came through in the answers. It speaks VOLUMES! I will list some highlights here…

  1. Their trademark ingredients have never been recalled
  2. Company standards include over 80 quality checks
  3. Checks include ingredients when they arrive all the way through finished product going out
  4. Recognized in 2020 by the U.S. Department of Commerce
  5. Facilities follow Good Manufacturing Practices and Standard Operating Procedures outlined by HACCP

I was curious about the claim that Cosequin is the #1 recommended joint health supplement by veterinarians. When asked when that survey was last conducted, I was pleasantly surprised to hear that it was updated just two years ago and plans to be conducted again in 2021. I was also happy to hear that the credentials of the creator and current leadership are honorable. I give Cosequin joint products a full five stars for company information and communication.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Sadly, I must remain consistent, and give Cosequin only two stars for feeding directions. Like too many supplements on the market today, there is very little guidance to horse owners how much product should be fed depending on size, activity level, age and/or severity of disease. Whether this is a sign of poor ingredient research or sheer laziness, I’m not sure, but it does not make sense to feed a 650 pound pony the same dosage as a 1,300 pound elite sport horse.

Ingredients List

Rating: 5 out of 5.

I chose to review Cosequin® Optimized with MSM due to the combination of three ingredients; glucosamine, chondroitin, and MSM. A sizable body of evidence now exists to support the claims made for these ingredients given orally to humans and animals. I have decided to NOT follow that rabbit hole of research in this review. If curious, you can review the references cited in the AAEP link above or type in “glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate” in Google Scholar. On Course Equine Nutrition maintains that these products will likely not harm, could possibly help, and will do damage to your bank account over time. As always, I suggest that you write down EXACTLY the results you’d like to see and find a way to measure those results before making your first supplement purchase.

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 5 out of 5.

One scoop (16.5 grams) of Cosequin® Optimized with MSM will provide 7,200 mg of Glucosamine Hydrochloride, 1,200 mg of chondroitin sulfate, and 5,000 mg of methylsulfonylmethane. These values are generous per serving. I appreciate the superscript note that the glucosamine and chondroitin sources may contain up to 10% moisture so that we can take that into consideration.

Cost

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The cost of 1400 gram bucket of Cosequin® Optimized with MSM is $109 on multiple websites such as Valley Vet and SmartPak. Since 1 scoop is the standard dose for a 1,000 lb horse in moderate work, you will pay $1.30 per scoop. For a joint supplement with greater than 5,000 mg/serving of glucosamine with very high quality standards from a reputable company, I think that this is a very fair price. *See reviews of Next Level by Farnam and Flex+Max by Absorbine for comparison. Another way to think about it is that you would spend 19 cents per 1,000 mg of glucosamine per day. This is half the cost per 1,000 mg of glucosamine compared to other similar products.

Summary

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Cosequin products are my first choice for personal use and top recommendation when joint supplementation is warranted. I trust the company’s quality control standards, I appreciate their professional correspondence, and believe that they provide a great value for the price.

Rate My Horse Supplement attempts to make clear that company integrity and product quality control are two primary factors in choosing a supplement in any category. At the end of the day, due to lack of third party regulation, it is up to supplement companies to provide us with safe products that have what they say they have. I have decided to scrap all the “he said/she said” research rumblings and tell you about this one study: “Analysis of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate Content in Marketed Products and the Caco-2 Permeability of Chondroitin Sulfate Raw Materials” by a team of researchers at the University of Maryland’s Pharmacokinetics-Biopharmaceutics Laboratory. This paper, published in 2000, analyzed 14 glucosamine and chondroitin products off the shelves and compared the label claims to the actual amount of ingredient found. You will be shocked at their findings. Please consider reading the DISCUSSION section on pages 6 and 7.

Adebowale, A.O., Cox, D.S., Liang, Z. and Eddington, N.D., 2000. Analysis of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate content in marketed products and the Caco-2 permeability of chondroitin sulfate raw materials. J Am Nutraceutical Assoc, 3(1), pp.37-44.

Swirsley N., H.S. Spooner, and R.M. Hoffman. 2017. Supplement Use and Perceptions: A Study of US Horse Owners. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. Volume 59:34-39. ISSN 0737-0806.

Redmond Rock™ on a Rope + crushed

  • Best Trait = palatable source of salt (NaCl)
  • Worst Trait = extremely expensive source of salt (NaCl)

Consider this product if…

  1. You’d like to enrich your horse’s confinement space with things to explore with their mouths
  2. You do not have a plain white salt source
  3. You like how the rock on a rope decorates your horse’s stall

Why Review this Product?

The company that produces and sells Redmond Rock has done an incredible job of making a ubiquitous, cheap horse nutrition ingredient interesting! Salt/sodium chloride/NaCl- in the most traditional sense of the word- is an essential ingredient to provide in any horse’s diet. I personally have a plain white salt block in every pasture and every paddock as forages, feeds and supplements are typically low in salt. But this company has reinvented a traditionally boring nutrient by making it 1) pretty, 2) convenient, and 3) popular. However, the myth that I’d like to dispel in this review is that Redmond Rock can constitute your horse’s comprehensive vitamin and mineral nutrition. It can not and should not. Let me show you how.

The Actual Review in 5 Parts

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 2 out of 5.

In my opinion, the marketing team at Redmond Rock takes one step too far in their marketing claims. Statements made on their website suggest that Redmond Rock products are SIGNIFICANT sources of electrolytes and trace minerals which they are absolutely NOT as you’ll see in the guaranteed analysis section. Secondly, horses do NOT have nutritional wisdom for minerals other than good ol’ salt. If your horse goes to town on these he/she is either lacking salt, bored, or exploring his/her environment with their mouths.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The crushed Redmond Rock comes with directions to topdress 1-3 ounces per day depending on the horses level of work. They should mention horse size and life stage to make this more clear. We can only assume that they mean an average 1,000 lb horse in moderate work.

The only suggestion for daily intake that I could find was a rough estimate that a standard 9 pound rock will last about 3 months. If we break that down, a normal horse will consume about 45 grams (1.6 oz) per day. That is roughly what other vitamin and mineral products suggest. So far, so good.

Ingredients List

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Redmond Rock is simply unrefined mineral salts mined from somewhere in Utah where a large ancient sea used to be. It is 91% salt and 9% everything else.

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 1 out of 5.

The guaranteed analysis is where Redmond Rock over promises. If we actually punch some numbers associated with the shockingly long guaranteed analysis (for a product that is 91% salt), then we see why we can not rely on this product to supply our horse’s daily requirement of essential trace minerals. Below is a comparison chart of Redmond Rock, a common ration balancer, performance feed, and a typical grass hay trace mineral profile. You can see that while ration balancers will exceed your horse’s daily trace mineral needs in just one pound, 1.6 ounces of the Redmond Rock salt will only meet 0.0114% of zinc, 0.114% of copper, and 0.52% of selenium requirements. Please, please, please do not rely on this product for your all important trace mineral source.

Cost

Rating: 2 out of 5.

A 7-10 lb rock costs $16.99 with free shipping. If we assume that the average consumption of 1.6 ounces per day is correct, then we can estimate that we’ll pay 19 cents per day to offer this salt product. To compare, a 50 pound plain white salt block at my local feed store costs $6.49. If we assume the same consumption rate (big assumption), then you’ll pay about 1.3 cents per day. That is 1/14th the cost of the Redmond Rock on a rope.

Twenty five pounds of the crushed will run you $50.50 on their website. That changes the daily cost to 25 cents per 2 ounce recommended serving.

A 50 pound salt block will cost you less than 2 cents per day.

Summary

Rating: 2 out of 5.

All horses need a salt source. Anecdotal evidence informs me that these Redmond Rock blocks on a rope are more palatable than the typical white blocks, so there is certainly value in that, and I do feel that the daily cost is reasonable for the rope option. However, I just wish that they wouldn’t mislead customers to thinking that this is a significant source of trace minerals. Those trace minerals are too important to overall horse health to get wrong.

My upper level is a strong salt licker, so I think I’ll grab one of these Redmond Rocks and set it next to her plain white salt block to experiment with palatability.

MVP Mega-Cell™ Pelleted Mineral and Vitamin Supplement

  • Best Trait = low cost
  • Worst Trait = low vitamin-mineral density compared to other products

Consider this product if…

  1. You would like to provide a trace mineral supplement over a ration balancer because you know that your forage is providing plenty of protein.
  2. You have an overweight/obese horse or generally easy keeper and do not need to add calories into their diet.
  3. You want to provide one simple, well rounded vitamin-mineral product to keep the diet simple.

Why Review this Product?

No matter where you are in the United States, it is very rare, if not completely impossible, to find hay or pasture that meets all of the vitamin and mineral needs of horses. This is especially true for the essential trace minerals selenium, zinc and copper. *Note that there are places in the U.S. with high levels of selenium and selenium accumulating plants. Therefore, it is paramount that horse owners provide sources of these trace minerals in some form; fortified feeds, ration balancers, pelleted supplements, loose/granular supplements, or lick tubs. Of these forms, the pelleted or granular vitamin-mineral supplement is probably the most common. The Cal Trace, Vermont Blend, MVP Mega-Cell and Platinum Performance Equine are all good examples of this category. Let’s compare their advantages and disadvantages.

The Actual Review in 5 Parts

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Med-Vet Pharmaceuticals has been in business for 27 years and sell equine supplements in every category from joint to metabolic, calming to hoof supplements. They proudly market the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC) seal which stands for something. Their website is clean, easy to navigate, and doesn’t over promise. Overall, the company seems legit and trustworthy.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 2 out of 5.

A 2 ounce serving is recommended for horses between 900- 1,100 lbs. There is no further detailing which is disappointing. However, I do appreciate how the caution statement says not to feed greater amounts due to selenium.

Ingredients List

Rating: 2 out of 5.

The ingredients list starts with alfalfa meal, soybean meal, wheat middlings, dried distillers solubles and rice bran as carriers of the vitamin-mineral which is interesting, because it reads like a performance or senior feed. It isn’t until the 9th and 13th ingredient that we get into actual trace elements like Vitamin E and zinc. That doesn’t leave much room for the important ingredients we’re feeding for in 2 ounces.

There are, however, several organic minerals, selenium yeast, vitamin E, and biotin. It would be nice to know what percentage of the zinc and copper is organic versus traditional inorganic. I’ll ask!

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 2 out of 5.

The guaranteed analysis is long but mostly meaningless as the primary reason that we feed this type of product is for the trace minerals zinc, copper and selenium. They go to a lot of trouble guaranteeing nutrients that aren’t in high enough doses to be meaningful. MVP Mega Cell is trying to be too many things in one little scoop. For example, the essential amino acids lysine and methionine are listed, but there is only 0.85 g (horses need 30+g) of lysine and only 0.425 g (horses need multiples of that) of methionine per 2 oz serving.

Copper and zinc are relatively low compared to the other vitamin-mineral products that I’ve reviewed recently, but they are adequate for horses at maintenance with low requirements.

Cost

Rating: 3 out of 5.

A ten pound bucket of MVP Mega-Cell will cost me $49.85 plus $6.95 to ship to Montana. That’s $56.80 for 80- 2oz servings. That means a 2 ounce serving will cost $0.71 per day. If I fed 3 ounces per day to get a little more trace mineral nutrition, it would cost $1.07 per day. That’s quite inexpensive, but also appropriate considering the low dosage of trace minerals present.

Summary

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

I would recommend this product for horses with easy, stress free lives as it just meets requirement at a very competitive price. I would not, however, use it for performance horses as the nutritional value is poor. I can get a LOT more in a ration balancer or one of the other vitamin-mineral products reviewed.

Vermont Blend Pro by Custom Equine Nutrition

  • Best Trait = Great value!
  • Worst Trait = no added vitamin E

Consider this product if…

  1. You would like to provide a trace mineral supplement over a ration balancer because you know that your forage is providing plenty of protein.
  2. You have an overweight/obese horse or generally easy keeper and do not need to add calories into their diet.
  3. You want to provide one simple, well rounded vitamin-mineral product to keep the diet simple.

Why Review this Product?

No matter where you are in the United States, it is very rare, if not completely impossible, to find hay or pasture that meets all of the vitamin and mineral needs of horses. This is especially true for the essential trace minerals selenium, zinc and copper. *Note that there are places in the U.S. with high levels of selenium and selenium accumulating plants. Therefore, it is paramount that horse owners provide sources of these trace minerals in some form; fortified feeds, ration balancers, pelleted supplements, loose/granular supplements, or lick tubs. Of these forms, the pelleted or granular vitamin-mineral supplement is probably the most common. The Cal Trace, Vermont Blend, MVP Mega-Cell and Platinum Performance Equine are all good examples of this category. Let’s compare their advantages and disadvantages.

The Actual Review in 5 Parts

Company Information & Communication

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I realize it’s a bit silly, but one of my favorite things about their advertising is that they say “no inactive ingredients” rather than “no fillers”.

Feeding Directions

Rating: 2 out of 5.

The feeding directions are sadly lacking. It simply says 2 oz for a 1,000 lb horse. There is no detailing for horses of various sizes, activity levels (though the product assumes the horse is in work), or life stage. I think that it’s only fair to horse owners that feeding directions be more complete as variations in horse need are infinite.

Ingredients List

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The ingredients shows organic minerals, selenium yeast, yeast products, and biotin- all ingredients that I like to see in a modern vitamin-mineral product. Similar to the Cal Trace Plus product recently reviewed, the ingredients include the three limiting amino acids lysine, methionine, and threonine and at roughly the same levels. Unlike the Cal Trace Plus, however, there is no added vitamin E. I give Vermont Blend Pro four stars for ingredients.

Guaranteed Analysis

Rating: 4 out of 5.

The Vermont Blend Pro label shows guarantees for the trace minerals zinc, copper, and selenium at great levels for horses in work when fed at 2 ounces per day.

Cost

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This product is not only robust, but also has a great price point compared to its competition. A 7.5 lb bucket (closest to the 10lb bucket used in competitive product reviews) will offer 60- 2 ounce servings at $90. With free shipping, this gives you a daily cost of $1.50 per day. I still prefer the value of ration balancers over vitamin-mineral products like Vermont Blend Pro, because you’ll spend about the same for MUCH more value. Ration balancers will have more than double the amino acids, more vitamins, greater likely digestive aid inclusion, and major minerals too. But, if you’re certain that a vitamin-mineral supplement is right for you, then this is a great option.

Summary

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I’m impressed with the Vermont Blend Pro and how it stacks up to its competition. I would not use it as my digestive aid if I felt like I really needed one, but the Yea-Sacc 1026 and BioMOS certainly don’t hurt the product and likely increase palatability.